Canna~Fangled Abstracts

Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats.

By November 26, 2014 No Comments
[Epub ahead of print]

pm1Cannabidiol fails to reverse hypothermia or locomotor suppression induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Growing evidence shows cannabidiol (CBD) modulates some effects of Δ9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD is a constituent of some strains of recreational cannabis but content is highly variable. High CBD strains may be less memory impairing than low-CBD strains and CBD can reverse behavioral effects of THC in monkeys. CBD/THC interactions in rodents are more complicated as it can attenuate or exacerbate the effects of THC. This study was undertaken to determine if CBD could reverse hypothermia or hypolocomotor effects caused by THC in rats.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES:

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with radiotelemetry devices and then challenged with doses of THC (10-30 mg·kg-1 , i.p.) in the presence or absence of CBD. Experiments determined the effect of simultaneous or 30 min pre-treatment with CBD in a 1:1 ratio with THC, as well as the effect of CBD in a 3:1 ratio. Additional experiments determined the effect of pretreatment with CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (Rimonabant).

KEY RESULTS:

CBD did not attentuate THC-induced hypothermia or hypolocomotion and instead an exaggeration was produced in some conditions. The antagonist SR141716 blocked hypolocomotor effects of THC for the first hour after injection and the hypothermia for six hours; thus the model was pharmacologically validated.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

There is no evidence from this study that elevated CBD content in cannabis provides protection from the physiological effects of THC.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID:

 25425111
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]twin memes II

en English